Authenticity, Social Media, &

In my work on media cultures, I’ve often asked questions about the “feminist” ones: What are the implications of surveillance for gendered and racialized bodies in the context of a “post-feminist” media culture? How do post-feminist questions of empowerment and responsibility become articulated when individuals operate the technologies that functionally surveil them? What do racially identificatory practices in digital social spaces do with/for discourses of whiteness and femininity? With my co-author Rachel Dubrofsky, I’ve explored some of these questions in the research linked below, with a focus on making sense of how social media operate as technologies of surveillance: we construct our digital selves through the actions we take on these sites when it comes to what we write, the photographs we post, and the interactions we have, and so embedded in these technologies are ideas about real bodies and the ways they are raced and gendered when people put themselves on display in their use of social media.
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Posting Racism and Sexism: Authenticity, Agency, and Self-Reflexivity in Social Media
with Rachel Dubrofsky (2014). Communication and Critical Cultural Studies 11 (3): 282-287.
Article
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When Celebrity Women Tweet: Examining Authenticity, Empowerment, and Responsibility in the Surveillance of Celebrity Twitter
(2013). USF Graduate Theses and Dissertations.
https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4855
Thesis
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Celebrity Women Tweet: White Women Working for the Gaze
with Rachel Dubrofsky (2015). In R. E. Dubrofsky and S. Magnet (eds.) Feminist Surveillance Studies. Durham: Duke University Press, 93-106.
Article